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20121224
20130101
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
biden, oliver perch from gary goldberg and matt cheslock and rick santelli, thank you very much. jarred, you wrote an article called "cliff dive, what the heck happens next?" what does happen next? >> well, that's actually all up to john boehner, as i see it, because if we were to decide to bring the president's most recent small car compromise to the house i actually believe it would pass. the problem for him it would probably pass with mostly democrat vote, but i think it could get through the senate. that's the only scenario i see by which we avoid going over the cliff. >> wait a minute. >> at least temporarily. >> wait a minute, jared. john boehner said it's up to the president and harry reid so are both sides standing at the precipice waiting for each other to make the next move. >> not really. it really is all up to john boehner to decide whether he wants to bring this vote to the house floor. if he doesn't, i would put on either your cliff bungee cord or your cliff parachute and that's actually an important difference. >> we would like a bungee cord and a parachute. >> right. >>
connell and vice president biden. but up until friday, senator mcconnell, the republican leader, hadn't been consulted, hadn't been advised, hadn't been involved in any of this. so he gets the call at the last minute to try to come in and sort of rescue this, starts a negotiation that goes over the weekend, and then saturday night makes a proposal to the senate democrats and was told that we'll react to your proposal by 10:00 sunday morning. 10:00 sunday morning passes, 11:00, noon, 1:00, 2:00. he comes to the floor and says we haven't heard back. then the majority leader says look, we don't have a counteroffer. we don't have a proposal. so senator mcconnell then gets on the phone with vice president biden, and that's now where those discussions are occurring. they're occurring between vice president biden and senator mcconnell. but my point, mr. president, is this, there are two people in a room deciding incredibly consequential issues for this country while 99 other united states senators and 435 members of the house of representatives, elected by their constituencies to come to washington
into his mother's head. the president has appointed vice president biden to come up with a task force to look of the issues. the president says that he promises real reforms now, but what are the odds on that? >> realistically, we can see a ban on assault weapons. whether that will address the problem, i do not think so. the problem is beyond the assault weapons. charles pointed out, in the post, there are some weapons out there now. there are thousands out there already in the community. >> and sales have gone up since this. >> that is all true but certainly we could do something about the size of these clips. having said that, we need to do something about our mental health system in this country. it is completely fallen apart. after the shootings at virginia tech, in the state of virginia, that appropriated $43 million more for mental health services. the next year, they cut it by $50 million. you cannot have a system that does not treat people. you cannot have a system that does not do something about committing people for -- more easily for periods of time to be able to treat the
with familiar states to tuck about the issue. >> they launched effort to curb gun violence putting biden in charge of a commission to spearhead that effort pursuing the policy changes. now to talk about that, joining us from austin, texas, karl rove, former senior advisor to president george w. bush. and joe trippi, democratic strategist who points out he was right a lot in 2012. thank you for joining us. talk about the way forward here, karl. how about this commission. how they push forward in washington, the current environment. >> there will be a lot of interest to do something immediately. senator feinstein said that she will reintroduce the assault weapons ban, the first day that congress is back in session in january. commission is a good idea provided it has bipartisan membership and gun control supporters and gun control opponents on it to look at this as a comprehensive issue. we have to be careful moving too quickly. yet, we have to have a comprehensive approach on the commission. i commend the president doing the commission. this could be way to find consensus about useful ste
was a young aid to president carter. vice president biden was in the senate. it was clearly on people's minds. also what was in the room, it's interesting, was one of the aspects that came out of desert one and that was the formation of a unified special operation forces command, the very troops, the forces here that would carry out this operation that had become such a unique asset of the united states. >> the president made one decision informed it seems to me like that history, which is he asked for two backup helicopters. >> the president asked for enough assets to ensure that the united states on its own could get in and could get out of the abbottabad compound. >> so now take us to that moment or was it a series of meetings what we now know is that vice president biden voiced reservations about an actual raid as opposed to a missile strike. secretary gates did. some key military leaders did. what was that like? was it a situation where the majority of the president's advisers were urging him not to do this? >> to get to this point, there were two dozen interagency meetings leading up to
the meeting and vice president biden is also there as well. we have a whole committee gathering at the white house. >> heavyweights. >> these are the most actively traded stocks at the new york stock exchange right now. stay with us. back in a minute. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe
to the audience. for example, on the on the other side, ryan debate against biden, he dance today the questions and never once did he turn to the audience hearing shear more media bias. the audience would have loved it independents would have agree that the media are biased against republicans. >> jon: all those debates, did they illuminate the process the presidential campaign? >> i think they did. first of all they were catnip for reporters. there were thousands of reporters. it was amazing that anything else got covered. when you have that many debates. you got to see these candidates and it was wide range of candidates, really demonstrating a capability or lack of capability on complex issuess. the voters made up their minds. you saw one media promoted figure fall after they couldn't stand the scrutiny that came upon a front-runner. >> jon: obama campaign made clear attempts of trying to demonize mitt romney. they settled on him as eventual challenger. media, as well. there was a newsweek cover poking fun at mitt romney's mormonism for example. >> media is a target rich environment. they ar
with the president since november 16th. vice president biden and treasury secretary timothy geithner also attend. but there was little to suggest the makings of an 11th hour bargain. a source familiar with the meeting told the newshour its president is sticking with his offer from last friday. it included keeping the bush era tax break force the middle class but raising tax rates on incomes over 250,000 dollars a year. president also wants to extend unemployment benefits for some 2 million americans who will lose them in the new year. and a proposal would delay any spending cuts. the president asked for an up or down vote on his plan unless there is a counter proposal that will pass both the house and senate. a little more than an hour after the meeting began, several participants were seen leaving. >> and back at the capital the senate's democratic majority leader harry reid and republican minority leader mitch mcconnell offered their takes on the meeting. >> we had a good meeting down at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader, myself and the white house, in the hop
this was going on, joe biden was just generally enjoying himself. >> i always say what i mean. >> in the end, neither a dominant first debate -- >> i have no idea what you're talking about. >> nor a virtuoso convention performance by clint eastwood. >> what do you want me to tell romney? can't do that to himself. >> nor this -- could carry mitt romney past the president. so very close to the oval office, romney now mostly hangs out at disney world. leaving the national stage along with romney in varying degrees of disgrace were general david petraeus, undone by an affair with his own biographer. lance armstrong stripped of everything, including the yellow jersey on his back. and governor "rocket" rob blagojevich, sent to a federal lock-up for 14 years for the crime of being a chicago politician. >> i thought about mandela, dr. king, gandhi. >> one of blago's old opponents in the illinois state legislature, republican mike bost, became a web star when he lost his mind in public. >> trying to be released! let my people go! >> meanwhile, down in the florida legislature, there was rigorous debat
president biden's chief economist and now senior fellow the center of budget and policy orders. msnbc contributor. we thank you so much for coming on the show. mr. bernstein, i want to put up a graphic in terms of the literal impact going over the fiscal cliff. if you make $20,000 you will see tax hike of $412. if you are middle $, 40,000 to $65,000, average tax hike of fearly nearly $2,000 which is significant. is this being lost on the policymakers now? >> i think it is. i mean -- if you -- were really concerned about how middle income people are doing and howing the unemployed are doing, how the average person who depends on their pay paycheck, not their stock portfolio is doing, you quickly resolve these cliff issues so the tax rates don't revert to get you the results you just showed. very quickly extend unemployment. i mean, i thought the point that someone made earlier in the reporting was critical. there are millions, couple million, actually, of unemployed people who have been on the rolls already. we know that they are hurting economically. there are not enough jobs out ther
with vice president biden and cantor. cantor walked out of those meetings. he's the majority leader in the house. the gang of six, the gang of eight. we had this super committee, and they were doing good things, good things, dealing with entitlements and revenues, and a week before they would report by virtue of statute i get a letter signed by every republican too, bad about the super committee, we're not going to do anything with revenues, so this is not a capsule of a couple of days. this has been going on for years. they cannot cross over the threshold that has been built by grover for vist. people who are rich who make a lot of money, her not opposing raising taxes on them. the only people in america who don't think taxes should be raised on the rich are the republicans who work in this building. any time bhth speaker and the republican leader come to the president and say we've got a deal for you. the president's door is always own, and mine is, too. >> the senate is back in session today and a lot of looking backwards, not necessarily looking forwards. certainly not so concis
as he and vice president biden are very close and i think they found they need each other i believe it was biden and this would not surprise any of you that was leaking to eric cantor that speaker boehner was pursuing separate talks with obama during the so-called -- in which eric cantor was a part. this may cantor livid and he walked out of those talks because of the dynamics going on with boehner. does this sound childish to you? >> the question i'm going to ask is that eric cantor walked past john boehner leaving out an open window -- window he would not hesitate to push him with a? >> for one 11 thing boehner is an even tempered so is boehner. unless the moment is absolutely right you tend not to be able to get ahead by declaring. >> the there is a -- between cancer and boehner. >> working more or less in the middle is the majority whip kevin mccarthy. mccarthy has, he has only been in for three terms and so in a lot of ways he is a freshman himself and he recruited a number of the freshman and became an away sort of the big brother to them. it was a very clever move on mccart
into law. let's talk about some, joe biden, for example, gets a raise 225 to now $231,000. we move on to a couple of others, if we can spin through to give you an example. john boehner increase of $1,000, so they're not enormous raises, they are fairly mottdest, right, peter? >> they are fairly modest, it affects not only congress, but the supreme court justices and also includes senior executives in the executive branch. the cost of this, according to the congressional budget office, is going to be about 1 billion dollars a year with this increase for senior executives in government. so, literally, think about this. they're talking about the fiscal cliff, they're talking about raising taxes and cutting spending. the only thing that's been accomplished thus far is to raise spending by about a billion dollars a year. >> dave: i think in particular rubs americans the wrong way when they see this, members of congress average salary, 174,000. average american, $48,000. that's on top of the fact that we see all the time, they take off, these long recesses and oh, by the way not passing
and joe biden, julia roberts and hillary clinton, madonna and colin powell. >> oh, lord, all those twosomes are unusual indeed. [sighs] and i am blanking on what thispc possibly could be. meredith, i'm question. meredith: no problem. question out of play. let's see the correct answer. julia roberts and hillary clinton. >> ok. meredith: now let's see what you jumped over. all the money's on the board. it could be any amount here. $1,000. not the worst-case scenario by any means. not bad. meredith: and by jumping over that money, you are one question closer to the million, now just 13 questions away."ancient tren "ancient trends" is the next category. finding 57 of them preserved on a 5,300-year-old mummy, scientists had to rethink the origins of what body decoration? tattoos, bracelets, piercings, necklaces. >> ha ha ha! tattoos. that makes sense if that's on a mummy. piercings would, too. my goodness. i'm not getting this one, either, meredith. i'm gonna have to jump this question. meredith: ok, we're gonna jump again. it's out of play. the right answer, please? the correct answer
sarah palin. so went to the front of the airplane to senator obama and senator biden had been newly selected as his running mate. he said i think i am reasonably smart. it took me like six months to figure out how to be a presidential candidate, how to deal with the stop light, how to -- spotlight, how to deal with the national politics. she may be the smartest politician ever and she may be able to come out of alaska to handle all of this. but i will give her three weeks. three weeks, we'll know if this is real. three weeks to the day, she did her interview with katie couric, which effectively ended it for her. i thought they might make -- [laughter] i thought that they might make a conservative choice, someone who had at least a taste of the national stage or, which was more of a consensus in the political committee, that he might take rob portman from ohio because ohio is so important. portman was a guy who is a center-right conservative, who might be more broad. i think barack was surprised by the choice. >> do you think portman could have changed the outcome? >> i don't know.
at a deadline at inauguration. in joe biden's language, will the fever break by the time the president is sworn in again for his second term? because if it doesn't, then whatever you see in the first week of trading now is going to be nothing, nothing compared to how global markets will react come the end of january. >> there's obviously a new congress coming in. does the composition in the new congress, can anybody figure out what happens there? >> well, i mean, numerically, it's more favorable to democrats, right? the house will still be controlled by john boehner. so you still have that divided congress. but the calculation is not, you know, a numerical one. it's the idea that if they go home -- first if they go home for christmas break, they'd feel the pressure, but it doesn't seem like that's coming. if they go over the cliff and they do mess with the debt ceiling, that people are going to get freaked and spooked because you'll start hearing stories about social security recipients facing the prospect of smaller checks from the government, unemployment insurance completely dried up, payrol
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)